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Personal Academic Tutoring (PAT) - Staff Resources

Personal Academic Tutoring (PAT) Role and Resources

These are a set of staff-facing resources to support PATs in their role supporting students:
  1. What is the personal tutor role and why is it important? 
  2. Core values and skills of the personal tutor
  3. Setting boundaries  
  4. Measuring the impact of our PAT role  
  5. One to one conversation and coaching  
  6. Supporting ‘at risk’ and ‘vulnerable’ students
  7. Re-engaging disengaged students  
  8. Working with international students
  9. Referral Guide

Sway

Title

Summary

1.

What is the personal tutor role and why is it important?

The role of a personal tutor identified here is very close to the role we have in the Personal Academic Tutor. Bear in mind that where it differs is in the level of emotional support possible, so you may need to direct students to those more expert in their knowledge in areas such as wellbeing or finance etc. However, the PAT role can support the development of e.g. confidence, motivation, self-esteem and satisfaction through individual tutoring.  

2.

Core values and skills of the personal tutor

The role of a personal tutor identified here is very close to the role we have in the Personal Academic Tutor.  All are based around professional values and approaches to people in the workplace.

It considers core values: high expectations, approachability, diplomacy, being non-judgemental, compassion, the ‘equal partner, not superior’ approach, genuineness.
It considers core skills: building rapport, active listening and questioning, challenging, reframing, reflecting back/summarising, teamwork, decision making/problem-solving, role modelling, pro-activity, creativity and motivation.

3.

Setting Boundaries

The role of a personal tutor identified here is very close to the role we have in the Personal Academic Tutor.  All are based around professional values and approaches to people in the workplace.

This SWAY identifies boundaries in areas of expertise, the temporal, behavioural and those between peers.

Key messages:
I need to use other ‘experts’ at times
I am a limited resource
I can influence not control behaviour
I can promote respect and professionalism amongst students
Recognise over-dependence and promote independence

4.

Measuring the impact of your personal tutor role

The role of a personal tutor identified here is very close to the role we have in the Personal Academic Tutor.  All are based around professional values and approaches to people in the workplace.

5.

One-to-one conversations and coaching

This SWAY identifies techniques that can be used in conversations with students as you discuss their progress and set targets. It shows the difference between solution talk and problem talk and 5 techniques from the OSKAR framework as examples of how this looks in practice. There is a useful summary of ‘dos and don’ts’ for one-to-one conversations.

6.

Supporting ‘at risk’ and ‘vulnerable’ students

Defining ‘at risk’ and ‘vulnerable’ is multifactorial and complicated, and even the use of these phrases can be contested. Here, possible factors that could influence the student are identified in relation to student, family, society, institution, external and individual and tools offered to help to keep your students on track.

7.

Re-engaging disengaged students

This SWAY introduces broad techniques that aim to give responsibility and ownership back to students, rather than try to control their behaviours. It suggests developing positive consequences rather than punitive ones. It defines disengagement, non-compliance and challenging behaviour before attempting to uncover the real reasons for these behaviours.

8.

Working with international students

Here are some general tips, including checking understanding, asking questions, understanding student perceptions and advising on dealing with homesickness.

9.

Referral Guide

The Referral Guide aims to facilitate all staff in signposting students to support services across the University. This includes when a students need support around the mental health and wellbeing, their disability (or suspected disability), their career prospects, their placement or their living arrangements.

If you have any feedback, suggestions for improvement or spot any errors on this page, please email further details to: ipark@hud.ac.uk, thank you.